Don’t Make These Silly Mistakes With Your New Restaurant

New restaurant owners are often quick to complain about the sorry state of their businesses. They blame the competition, the lack of customer interest and even the weather. But the truth is that many new restaurants aren’t attracting customers because their business model is wrong.

It’s true that it’s a tough to make it in the restaurant business. But that doesn’t mean that it’s impossible to compete with established outfits. It just means that new restaurateurs have to think strategically and professionally. Unfortunately, most don’t get it right straight away, and this can lead to heartache and pain down the road.

Here are some silly mistakes you don’t want to make with your new restaurant business.

 

Failing To Focus On Your Objectives

Failing to focus on your core product is a mistake that businesses the world over make, not just the restaurant trade. But it’s something that budding restaurateurs should be aware of, nonetheless.

From the outset, it’s important that you have a clear idea of what it is that you restaurant offers. You need to have some sort of unique value proposition or selling point. If you don’t, customers will wonder why they should choose you over their regular joint.

Make sure that you value proposition permeates everything you do. All your staff should know why you do what you do and what makes your company unique.

 

Failing To Utilize Seating

Have you ever walked into a restaurant to find a whole bunch of tables “reserved” and nowhere for you to sit? It’s infuriating for customers and bad news for businesses. Customers who can’t even get in the door are far less likely to return to your establishment in the future. One way to manage reservations more efficiently is to use apps, like Rezbook and OpenTable. These apps ensure that you’re utilising your seating to maximum effect.

Another mistake that restaurants make is not tracking party size. Knowing whether you’re going to get parties of two or parties of four affects the restaurant furniture you buy. If you expect a lot of couples to your restaurant, you’ll have a lot of two-seater tables. But if you expect a lot of families, you’ll want tables that seat anywhere from four to eight.

 

Being An Absent Owner

Often business owners take a back seat in the restaurant trade. They see themselves as being people who work on, rather than work in, their businesses. But taking such a hands-off approach is a mistake for many reasons.

For starters, without the owner present, standards can decline very quickly. Often managers are unable to operate businesses without some direction from the owners. And frequently, you can end up with a service that doesn’t reflect your vision for the firm.

 

But it’s also important that your staff have the input of somebody who is passionate about the business in which they work. It’s all too easy to get caught up in the day-to-day of the business and to forget what makes what they’re doing exciting. Owners who are absent can’t communicate to their employees why their work is important. And without that, the business suffers.

 

Featured image source: pixabay.com

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